Celluloid Diaries: Jewish movie night recipes

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Jewish movie night recipes

most popular jewish movie night recipes

A guest post by Karen Malena

Being Italian, I’ve not had much call for Jewish movie night recipes. If it doesn’t have sauce on it, anise oil, or ricotta cheese, then I probably haven’t made it.

Recently, though, while writing about a man who finds his Jewish ancestry, I’ve done a little research on all things Hebrew. For instance, did you know that Chanukah is celebrated for eight nights? The children play spin the dreidel and adults play it as a gambling game. The prize is candy or “gelt,” an old Jewish coin, now chocolate. The dreidel is a four-sided top with the Jewish letters: Nun, Gimel, He and Shin on each side. The letters stand for “Ness Gadol Hayah Sham--A great miracle happened there.”

My new book, Sound of Silence, talks about the parallels between the Holocaust and a futuristic society. Since my main character, Ray finds out he’s Jewish, he also learns about his ancestors who had been in Auschwitz death camp. Ray lives in a time where a narcissistic senator’s decree of silence holds the country and a powerful secret in the palm of his hand. In a moment of kindness, Ray breaks the law and puts his wife and beautiful daughter directly in the path of danger.

I am out of my familiar comfort zone with a book of this nature. My other published works are mostly inspirational family fiction.

One of my favorite sayings while writing this book has been: “Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” George Santayana

I believe we must remember the Holocaust of the nineteen forties. A time when a madman ruled Germany and thought he could erase a whole nation of people from the face of the earth. For how could we ever hope to not repeat this type of terror if we don’t teach about it in our schools and educate the young people of today?

In honor of my Jewish friends, today I present some of the more popular Jewish movie night recipes.


hamantachen jewish recipe


Hamantachen



Hamantachen is a traditional cookie usually made for Purim. Purim celebrates the Jews salvation from Haman who planned to kill the race. As it‘s a festive holiday, many dress up similar to Halloween for this day.

Ingredients: 4 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup Crisco, 3 tablespoons baking powder, 1 tablespoon salt, ¼ cup orange juice, 1 tablespoon vanilla (add to juice), 5 cups flour

Directions: Combine eggs, sugar, and Crisco. Add flour and juice until dough looks and feels like a cookie dough. Refrigerate two hours or overnight. Divide dough into three pieces. Keep unused dough covered with wax paper while working. Roll out (not too thin) and cut into 3 or 4-inch circles. Fill with favorite Baker’s filling, bring up sides to make a triangle. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes or until edges are golden brown. Makes approximately 4 dozen.


noodle kugel jewish recipe


Noodle Kugel



Noodle Kugel, a traditional Shabbat dish is a holiday favorite. While noodle and potato kugel are traditionally made on Shabbat or holidays, matzo kugel is made for Passover.

Ingredients: 1 pound bag wide egg noodles, ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar, 5 eggs (beaten), 1 pound cottage cheese (small curd), 2 cups sour cream, 1 can crushed pineapple (drained well), 2 cups corn flakes (crushed), ½ teaspoon cinnamon, 2 tablespoons butter (softened)

Directions: Boil noodles in salted water for five minutes. In a large bowl, mix noodles, cottage cheese, sour cream, and crushed pineapple. Add sugar and beaten eggs. Mix well. Pour into 13 x 9 glass pan.

In a separate bowl, stir together cornflakes, 2 tablespoons sugar, and cinnamon and sprinkle evenly over noodles. Top with Maraschino cherries or canned peaches (optional). Dot with butter and bake until kugel is set and edges are golden brown about 1 hour. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Pour over top of noodles. Bake at 375 for 30 to 45 minutes or until brown on top and sides.


latkes jewish recipe


Latkes



Latkes or potato pancakes are a traditional Chanukah dish. Chanukah is known as the festival of lights and observes the victory of the Israelites over the Syrian-Greek army, and the restoring of the menorah in the holy temple. The miracle of Chanukah is that only one vial of oil was found with just enough oil to light the menorah for one day, but it lasted eight days.

Ingredients: 2 pound peeled and shredded potatoes (3 large potatoes), 1 small grated onion, 3 eggs (beaten), ¼ cup flour, 1 ½ teaspoons salt, ½ teaspoon pepper, oil for frying

Directions: Place the potatoes in a cheesecloth (you can use a clean dish towel). Wring, getting out as much moisture as possible. In a medium bowl, stir the potatoes, onion, eggs, flour, salt and pepper together.

In a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat, heat the oil until hot. Place large spoonfuls of the potato mixture into the hot oil, pressing down on them to form ¼ to ½ inch thick patties. Brown on one side, turn and brown on the other. Let drain on paper towels.

To keep latkes warm. Place on baking pan lined with paper towels and put in a 200-degree oven.

Serve with applesauce or sour cream.

Note: The key to crispy latkes is making sure you get as much water squeezed out as possible.

sound of silence


A dark, all-encompassing law blankets the country. 

Driven by a terrible secret, a powerful politician brutally suppresses speech for the sake of order and holds the country in the palm of his hand. 

Ray Warren does the unthinkable. In a bold gesture, he seals his fate in a moment of kindness, a moment that marks Ray, his wife and beautiful daughter as dangerous fugitives and sets a society toward rebellion. 

In Sound of Silence, an ominous new society is introduced leaving us with the question: What if?

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popular jewish recipes
jewish movie night recipes

28 comments:

  1. Thanks so much!! The pictures look wonderful. Now if only if it was futuristic enough to reach right through that screen and take a bite of those yummy looking goodies!

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  2. Some still don't think the Holocaust happened, which is really sad.
    Interesting recipes. All sound very simple to make though.

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  3. Yum! What time's dinner? I'll be right over!
    Thanks for linking up at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2015/11/basilica-shrine-of-saint-mary.html

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  4. They look delicious now I want some LOL :-)

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  5. Wish I could taste! Yum! Teresa from Nanahood

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  6. darn!!! I want to win the Jewish Recipe book, the heck with the other one (sorry!) I'm Jewish and my mouth is watering!! catchatwithcarenandcody

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  7. Yummy yum yum Karen! My mother in law makes some of these recipies. They were passed down from her family.

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    1. Wonderful!! I've never tried any of them. Thank you for commenting my friend!

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  8. Great way to tie-in your story! Also, great cover, very powerful!

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  9. Mmmmm Kugel! My cousin is jewish. She used to make some of those recipes.

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  10. Matzo ball soup - I make it a few times a year and it is always a little different. I had a Jewish housemate in college and learned her way, and then modify it according to what I got in veggies and what I feel like. Always so good!

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  11. We must never forget the terrible Holocaust. Today, there is a new Holocaust out in the mid east. Terrorists are out to destroy anyone who disagrees with them. It is just as bad, if not worse as what the world went through in the 1930's and 40s with Hitler. History does repeat itself. Good luck with your new book!

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  12. I like the idea of sharing Jewish recipes. While in New York last week I wanted to go and eat at Katz's Deli. But I didn't make it, I'm afraid.

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  13. I think Latkes would be my favorite dish. The kids in South Africa learn about WWII a lot during history class. I spent some years in Germany as a kid and later as a teenager and heard that the school kids weren't really learning about it. I agree that we must know so that we don't repeat. Sounds like a fascinating read. Thanks for linking on Amanda's Books and More!

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  14. My bubby's matzah ball soup recipe is the only matzah ball recipe I'll go near.

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  15. Great recipes! Thanks for sharing at My Flagstaff Home!

    Jennifer

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  16. A sweet or savory KUGEL is my favorite.

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  17. The triangle things look awesome! -Jessica!

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  18. My favorite is challah bread because the kids have fun making it and hearing the story.

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  19. Excellent post! everything looks so yummy!

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  20. I've only had latkes. The other recipes look delicious too. Sound of Silence looks like a great read with an interesting premise.

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  21. It looks like this meal is very tasty. I'll definitely try to cook it. So thank you a ot for this great recipe you posted here. Besides very nice blog you have!

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